Centinel, to the people of Pennsylvania.
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Centinel, to the people of Pennsylvania. Number I. Friends, countrymen, and fellow-citizens, Permit one of yourselves to put you in mind of certain liberties and privileges secured to you by the Constitution of this commonwealth, and beg your serious attention to his uninterested opinion upon the plan of fœderal government submitted to your consideration, before you surrender these great and valuable privileges up forever. ... by Samuel Bryan

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Published by s.n. in [New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • United States.,
  • Federal government -- United States.,
  • Freedom of the press.,
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1783-1789.

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 45045.
ContributionsBryan, Samuel, 1759-1821., Timoleon.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 sheet ([2] p.)
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17692481M

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From the Independent gazetteer, &c. Centinel No. V. To the people of Pennsylvania: Friends, countrymen, and fellow-citizens, Mr. Wilson in a speech delivered in our convention on Saturday the 24th instant, has conceded, nay forceably proved, that one consolidated government, will not answer for so extensive a territory as the United States includes, that slavery would be the necessary state. Centinel, to the people of Pennsylvania Number I. Friends, countrymen, and fellow-citizens, Permit one of yourselves to put you in mind of certain liberties and privileges secured to you by the Constitution of this commonwealth, and beg your serious attention to his uninterested opinion upon the plan of fœderal government submitted to your. Source: Herbert J. Storing, ed., The Complete Anti-Federalist, vol. 2, To the Freemen of Pennsylvania Friends, Countrymen and Fellow Citizens, Permit one of yourselves to put you in mind of certain liberties and privileges secured to you by the constitution of this commonwealth, and to beg your serious attention to his uninterested opinion upon the plan of federal government submitted. Jan 26,  · Centennial: A Novel - Kindle edition by James A. Michener, Steve Berry. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Centennial: A Novel/5().

Book Review: The "Centinel": Warnings of a Revolution, Edited by Elizabeth I. NybakkenAuthor: Frederic Trautmann. Samuel Bryan (September 30, in Philadelphia — October 6, in Chester County, Pennsylvania) was a resident of Pennsylvania and Anti-Federalist author, who wrote during the Confederation Period. Historians generally ascribe to him the Letters of Centinel written under the pseudonym Centinel between and Born: September 30, , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Michener details the story of a Colorado settlement, Centennial, from the geology and the prehistoric animals all the way up to the modern day. There's native Americans, the trappers and early settlers, cattle ranching vs. sheep herding, con artists, the circus coming to /5. Centennial is a novel by American author James A. Michener, published in Centennial traces the history of the plains of northeast Colorado from prehistory until the early s. Geographic details about the fictional town of Centennial and its surroundings indicate Author: James A. Michener.

Centinel II To the PEOPLE of PENNSYLVANIA. FRIENDS, COUNTRYMEN, and FELLOW-CITIZENS, As long as the liberty of the press continues unviolated, and the people have the right of expressing and publishing their sentiments upon every public measure, it is next to impossible to enslave a free nation. The owners of the fast-casual Mediterranean restaurant’s self-stated goal is to appeal to the workers in the area who seek healthy lunch and dinner choices. Books shelved as pennsylvania-history: The Johnstown Flood by David McCullough, Harrisburg by Linda A. Ries, The Great Book of Pennsylvania: The Crazy Hi. In the fall of an anonymous anti-Federalist, writing under the pseudonym Centinel, wrote Anti-Federalist Arguments from Pennsylvania. The first of these two letters appeared in the Philadelphia Independent Gazetteer on October 5th of that year.